Article

How is SOS like a power plant?

Many of you may know me as the SOS community relations director. I have been with SOS one and one-half years. My experience is vast in media/community relations and crisis communications but in other venues than non-profits. I worked for a nuclear power plant for 15 years. Recently, I caught myself comparing SOS to a nuclear power and realized there are many similarities between
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Stalking Awareness

In a healthy relationship, you feel free to make your own decisions. You know your partner or friend values your opinion and safe boundaries. You do not try to control your partner’s actions or feelings. Relationships are not about ownership- they are about sharing love.
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Domestic Violence questions you’ve wanted to ask, but didn’t!

We interviewed Yvette Sosa, SOS bilingual victim advocate, to learn answers to the burning questions you’ve wanted to ask, but never did. What is the most common type of domestic abuse? Verbal and emotional abuse. “It usually starts with name calling – making the person feel worthless,” said Yvette. “Often victims talk themselves out of realizing they are being victimized by minimizing the situation….
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Empowering teen bystanders

Aside

From CNN.com

In America, fear is king.

Instant media highlight our worst fears every second with stories of violence and crime. Some fear is more subtle and pervasive: don’t speak up if you see something because you don’t want get into someone else’s ‘business.’

When a teen is killed by a partner, often communities are shocked. They didn’t realize what was going on underneath the surface. Society tries to absolve itself from action by casting the perpetrator as a ‘monster’ or mentally ill. But there is something communities can do besides being afraid. They can stand up when they see symptoms of abuse. Empowered bystanders can help diffuse a situation.

SOS serves teens facing dating violence or sexual assault through Crisis Services. Teens or friends of teens can call our 24 hr hotline 620-342-1870 or 800-825-1295.  Beyond crisis services, SOS provides prevention education in area schools about healthy relationships, dating violence and respect.

People, especially teens, think there’s only one way to respond to a tense situation, either by sticking their necks out or doing nothing at all. There are a lot of options in between,” said Safe Schools Coordinator Lori Hodin, who helped start the program at Lincoln-Sudbury.

Male and female student athletes participated in daylong training sessions using the “MVP playbook,” which employs sports terms to discuss scenarios from the minefield of adolescence. Hodin and four faculty facilitators led discussions on ways bystanders could respond, and how to recognize themselves as potential perpetrators.

Click the slideshow to see what steps the student athletes recommend for real scenarios.

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submitted by Elizabeth Kennedy


Flames in the Flint Hills

Generations of ranchers and farmers have learned ways to tame the fires of the prairie and now generations of well intentioned citizens and professionals must learn how to tame the fire of violence. SOS, Inc. is committed to improving the lives of those affected by sexual and domestic violence and child abuse and neglect.
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